The joy is being sucked out of the practice of medicine. Here’s why.

Many providers — primary care physicians, physician assistants, and even many beleaguered specialists — are increasingly dissatisfied with their jobs.

What is happening to medical practice and what can we do to bring the joy back to being a health care provider?

She came to the urgent care center with a sprained ankle. The primary care provider gave her excellent care, expertly applying evidence-based evaluation guidelines to her situation, and, thereby, avoiding unnecessary x-rays. By all measures, the provider’s care was excellent, but the interaction still ended up reducing his salary. You see, that patient’s only medical interaction that year was for this ankle sprain, and the provider was therefore held accountable for all of her primary care needs. Since she had not received a mammogram that year, or received a diabetes screening, he incurred an end-of-the-year penalty for failing to meet these quality standards.

I am early into a one-year quest to connect with leading thinkers from inside and outside medical care, so I can better understand why many clinicians are miserable in their careers, and much more importantly, what can be done to help them thrive at work even though an increasing number of outside parties are looking over their shoulder, assessing the quality of the care they provide.

These increasingly burdensome rules and regulations are making it hard to enjoy medical practice these days. Several decades ago, physicians largely practiced as autonomous professionals, governed by standards developed by their professional peers. Physicians underwent intense and prolonged training to develop the knowledge and skills to know how best to help patients with their problems. And the world generally stood back and accepted, on faith, that most physicians would provide excellent care to most of their patients.

In recent years, however, outsiders have increasingly tried to assess just how well physicians are performing their jobs. Insurance companies and Medicare administrators are measuring the quality of care physicians provide, and even holding them financially accountable when that care is not up to standards. In part, these external accountability measures have been put into place because people paying for medical care — insurance companies, Medicare administrators, and even patients — realized that the quality of medical care wasn’t always as high as it ought to be. And since the profession wasn’t doing everything it could to promote high quality, they recognized that somebody from the outside needed to hold physicians accountable for their practice. As a result, medical practice has shifted from being autonomous to supervised; physicians have gone from being independent decision-makers to being bureaucrats forced to check boxes.

Click here to read all of this article originally posted on KevinMD.com

Leave a Reply