Many People Who Think They Are ‪Allergic‬ To ‪Penicillin‬ May Safely Take It

November 7th, 2015 by admin

By Julienne Roman,

Researchers found that most people who are told that they are allergic to penicillin were mistakenly diagnosed as such based on initial reactions instead of a confirmatory test.

This mistaken perception led many to opt for more dangerous antibiotics and other treatments for their infections. Researchers pointed out that the patients who were thought to be penicillin-allergic had to take other antibiotics that put them at greater risk for acquiring complications such as colitis and the development of more antibiotic-resistant strains.

Study authors therefore stress the need to specifically test for penicillin allergy on suspected patients.

“Anyone who has been told they are penicillin allergic, but who hasn’t been tested by an allergist, should be tested,”said Dr. David Khan from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center.

He added that if patients are determined to be allergic, doctors will be able to determine which treatment options are most suited with the full confidence that it is the best course of action for the patient. But if the tests turned negative, then the patient will be able to take a drug that is just as effective as most antibiotics while being safer and more cost-effective.

Researchers studied data from patients who were reportedly allergic to penicillin but when tested were actually found to be negative. The team later found that the patients could be treated safely with the mentioned antibiotic even through intravenous injection.

“There is often thought to be a higher risk in patients who get intravenous penicillin, but we did not find this to be the case,” Khan added.

The misconception often stems from wrongly interpreting symptoms that manifest after taking the drug as signs of an allergic reaction. This mistake happens about 90 percent of the time among patients.

Penicillin side effects that include nausea and vomiting, mild diarrhea or headache commonly occur while taking the drug but do not herald an allergic reaction or are considered dangerous enough to halt continued taking of the drug.

Ever since its discovery, penicillin still remains a popular antibiotic because of its effectiveness and relatively low level of toxicity on healthy human cells. It comes in several different, non-interchangeable forms, and each one is often used to treat different infections.

However, there are people who are allergic to the drug, and people who report developing a rash, itching or difficulty of breathing while using the drug are advised to report these findings to a physician for a confirmatory test.

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Members of Congress Put Costly Drugs in Their Crosshairs

November 7th, 2015 by admin
  • by Shannon Firth

WASHINGTON — Prescription drug prices are getting more attention on Capitol Hill, with two senators from opposite sides of the aisle announcing plans to investigate while House Democrats declared they were forming a task force on the issue as well.

Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.) and Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) this week announced a bipartisan probe into drug costs, according to a press release from McCaskill’s office. The senators are requesting drug pricing information from four companies whose products’ prices have recently spiked: Valeant Pharmaceuticals, Turing Pharmaceuticals, Retrophin, and Rodelis Therapeutics.

“We need to get to the bottom of why we’re seeing huge spikes in drug prices that seemingly have no relationship to research and development costs,” McCaskill said, in the statement.

According to the release, the investigation will look into:

  • “Substantial price increases on recently acquired off-patent drugs”
  • “Mergers and acquisitions within the pharmaceutical industry that have led to dramatic increases in off-patent drug prices”
  • “The FDA’s role in the drug approval process for generic drugs, the agency’s distribution protocols, and, if necessary, its off-label regulatory regime”

The Senate Special Committee on Aging has scheduled an initial hearing on this issue for Dec. 9.

At a press briefing on Wednesday, Rep. Lloyd Doggett (D-Texas) announced the formation of the “Affordable Drug Pricing Task Force.”

House representatives said they hope to advance legislation that would enable Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Burwell to negotiate Medicare prices and to force drug companies to be transparent about the cost of making their products.

Doggett cited the now infamous example of Turing Pharmaceutical’s Daraprim (pyrimethamine), a drug for treating infections common in patients with cancer and AIDS. After the company acquired the drug 3 months ago, the price went from $13.50 to $750 per tablet. On Tuesday, the company said it would lower the price by the end of the year, but did not say by how much.

“But exorbitant drug prices are not about one wrongdoing, or one drug, or one class of drugs; they are a systemic problem that involve a wide range of manufacturers,” said Doggett while standing at a podium flanked by posters of Turing’s CEO Martin Shkrelivilified by the media for his tone-deaf comment that his actions would benefit society — and Michael Pearson, CEO of Valeant Pharmaceuticals.

Click here to read the rest of this article

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Fixing Healthcare Can Be As Close As Your Neighborhood Pharmacy

April 15th, 2014 by admin

by John Nosta

The clinical emergency is medicine itself

Demand for primary care services is projected to increase through 2020, due to the increasing aging and population as well as the expanded insurance coverage implemented under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). In other words, the demand for primary care physicians will grow more rapidly than the supply, resulting in a projected shortage of over 20,00 full-time physicians.

The value of your neighborhood pharmacy

Nearly 70% of Americans are on at least one prescription drug and over 50% of Americans are on at least two prescription drugs. Given the shaky assumption that these folks are actually taking their medicines, it’s fair to say that beyond the physician, the pharmacist plays a key role in the health dynamic. Currently pharmacists can provide many services to their patients–from information to specific medicines.  In fact, the pharmacy is often a first source of medical information for many.  Pharmacy services have evolved from strictly dispensing medications to offering services such as medication therapy management, medication education, improving medication adherence, administering immunizations, and health/wellness. In addition, pharmacists can now be found in specialty areas such as oncology, organ transplant and even psychiatry. RxWiki–an on-line patient information service–now extends the pharmacy experience into the digital landscape, offering patients on demand access to medication information, pharmacy transactions, and medication adherence. RxNetwork is another emerging company with a unique methodology to link the pharmacy and patient–providing real-time support from compliance to education.  RxNetwork’s patient relationship management solution bridges the pharmacy-patient communication gap and provides an efficient, non-disruptive solution for the pharmacies with a convenient, rewarding, motivating solution to their connected patients.

Click here to read the rest of this article by John Nosta in Forbes Magazine

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University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston scientists successfully grow human lungs in lab in 3 days

February 14th, 2014 by admin

by 

Growing organs may seem like science fiction, but it’s the goal of medical researchers because so many people need organ transplants and many die waiting for one.

“The most exciting part is to shorten the time people have to wait for an organ transplant,” said UTMB Dr. Joaquin Cortiella.

How did they do it? They started with a damaged lung.

“We removed all the cells all the material in it, and just left the skeleton of the lung, or the scaffold, behind — the pieces of the lungs that are no cells. That’s why it’s so white and pretty and there’s no blood in it, it’s very pretty looking. And then we added back cells from another lung that couldn’t be used for transplant but still had some viable cells in it,” said Dr. Joan Nichols, who leads the UTMB team.

But it took months until a UTMB medical student named Dr. Michael Riddle built a piece of equipment that sped up the process.

“He’s the one who went home and actually built using — I’m not kidding — a fish tank that he went and bought from a pet store, is what he built the first piece of equipment,” Dr. Nichols said.

“Took us about four months to take the cells from the lung to where all you have is a bio-scaffold, and we took that process down to about three days,” Dr. Riddle said.

UTMB scientists grew their first human lungs in the lab last year. Eyewitness News is the first to report it.

“It’s taken us a year to prove to ourselves that we actually did a good job with it. You don’t run out immediately and tell the world you have something wonderful until you’ve proved it to ourselves that we really did something amazing,” Dr. Nichols said.

Dr. Nichols says they hope to transplant the first set of lab-grown lungs in animals this year or next.

How soon could their lab-grown lungs be ready to save human lives? They aren’t sure, but estimate between 5 and 10 years, maybe longer.

Click here for a link to the original articlle and a news video

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