Canada’s Single-Prayer Health Care

By INVESTOR’S BUSINESS DAILY

IBD Exclusive Series: Government-Run Healthcare: A Prescription For Failure

Health Reform: A critically ill premature baby is moved to a U.S hospital to get the treatment she couldn’t get in the system we’re told we should emulate. Cost-effective care? In Canada, as elsewhere, you get what you pay for.

Ava Isabella Stinson was born last Thursday at St. Joseph’s hospital in Hamilton, Ontario. Weighing only two pounds, she was born 13 weeks premature and needed some very special care. Unfortunately, there were no open neonatal intensive care beds for her at St. Joseph’s — or anywhere else in the entire province of Ontario, it seems.

Canada’s perfectly planned and cost-effective system had no room at the inn for Ava, who of necessity had to be sent across the border to a Buffalo, N.Y., hospital to suffer under our chaotic and costly system. She had no time to be put on a Canadian waiting list. She got the care she needed at an American hospital under a system President Obama has labeled “unsustainable.”

Jim Hoft over at Gateway Pundit reports Ava’s case is not unusual. He reports that Hamilton’s neonatal intensive care unit is closed to new admissions half the time. Special-needs infants are sent elsewhere and usually to the U.S.

In 2007, a Canadian woman gave birth to extremely rare identical quadruplets — Autumn, Brooke, Calissa and Dahlia Jepps. They were born in the United States to Canadian parents because there was again no space available at any Canadian neonatal care unit. All they had was a wing and a prayer.

The Jepps, a nurse and a respiratory technician flew from Calgary, a city of a million people, 325 miles to Benefit Hospital in Great Falls, Mont., a city of 56,000. The girls are doing fine, thanks to our system where care still trumps cost and where being without insurance does not mean being without care.

Infant mortality rates are often cited as a reason socialized medicine and a single-payer system is supposed to be better than what we have here. But according to Dr. Linda Halderman, a policy adviser in the California State Senate, these comparisons are bogus.

As she points out, in the U.S., low birth-weight babies are still babies. In Canada, Germany and Austria, a premature baby weighing less than 500 grams is not considered a living child and is not counted in such statistics. They’re considered “unsalvageable” and therefore never alive.

Norway boasts one of the lowest infant mortality rates in the world — until you factor in weight at birth, and then its rate is no better than in the U.S.

In other countries babies that survive less than 24 hours are also excluded and are classified as “stillborn.” In the U.S. any infant that shows any sign of life for any length of time is considered a live birth.

A child born in Hong Kong or Japan that lives less than a day is reported as a “miscarriage” and not counted. In Switzerland and other parts of Europe, a baby is not counted as a baby if it is less than 30 centimeters in length.

In 2007, there were at least 40 mothers and their babies who were airlifted from British Columbia alone to the U.S. because Canadian hospitals didn’t have room. It’s worth noting that since 2000, 42 of the world’s 52 surviving babies weighing less than 400g (0.9 pounds) were born in the U.S.

It must be embarrassing to Canada that a G-7 economy and a country of 30 million people can’t offer the same level of health care as a town of just over 50,000 in rural Montana. Where will Canada send its preemies and other critical patients when we adopt their health care system?

As we have noted, in Canada roughly 900,000 patients of all ages are waiting for beds, according to the Fraser Institute. There are more than four times as many magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) units per capita in the U.S. as in Canada. We have twice as many CT scanners per capita.

Expensive? Wasteful. Just ask the Jepps or the parents of Ava Isabella Stinson.

FDA Confirms E. Coli in Prepackaged Nestlé Toll House Refrigerated Cookie Dough

FDA Confirms E. Coli O157:H7 in Prepackaged Nestlé Toll House Refrigerated Cookie Dough

Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced that it has found E. coli O157:H7 (a bacterium that can cause serious food borne illness) in a sample of prepackaged Nestlé Toll House refrigerated cookie dough currently under recall by the manufacturer and marketer, Nestlé USA.  The contaminated sample was collected at Nestlé’s facility in Danville, Va. on June 25, 2009.

On June 19, the FDA and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned consumers not to eat any varieties of prepackaged Nestlé Toll House refrigerated cookie dough due to the risk of contamination with E. coli O157:H7.  The warning was based on an epidemiological study conducted by the CDC and several state and local health departments. As of Thursday, June 25, the CDC reports that 69 persons from 29 states have been infected with the outbreak strain. Thirty-four persons have been hospitalized, nine with a severe complication called hemolytic uremic syndrome. No one has died.

Click here to read the rest of this news release from the FDA >  E. Coli in Prepackaged Nestle …

Pharmacist and Haiti medical missionary Ed Monroe

Pharmacist and Haiti medical missionary Ed Monroe

I have known Ed Monroe for a couple of years.  We became aware of each other because we are both pharmacists and we both have a heart for Haiti’s incredible people.   I first found out about Ed at  Friends of the Children of Haiti

Ed has been retired for a couple of years, but his primary focus has been on Haiti for a long time.

Ed lives near Chicago in Peoria, Illinois. He puts together several medical missions to Haiti every year. Ed can always use more volunteer missionaries with all kinds of skills and backgrounds. He can always use more money also.

If you live near Chicago and are interested in helping Ed out you can contact him on his web site or you can email him at [email protected]

You can learn more about Ed and his missions to Haiti by following him by clicking on this link to his blog at  What’s Ed Up to Now

Here’s a copy of an entry in Ed’s blog:

“We survived the trip over the mountains from the clinic to the PAP airport although there was some scares along the way. As of today, Monday, I have heard from some of the team and all are at home or will soon be home safely.”

”On Thursday we finished seeing patients sometime around noon. Our team saw a record 2212 patients on this mission. I am so very proud of all of the team members. After lunch, some of the team headed for the beach while a few of us readied the clinic for inventory and clean up. When the team returned they worked hard and completed the inventory. I should tell you that we had extra items to count. You may recall that Lynn and I had an appointment at a nearby school on Tuesday to pick up supplies. That turned out to be 4 truckloads of merchandise. We retrieved one on Tuesday and one on Wednesday and Boyer finished the work for us so we could get back to seeing patients. Some of the boxes were infested with termites. I managed to get bitten by a spider as I carried some boxes. I have the list of supplies so that our medical supply people can go over them. I did discover a full case of pints of cough syrup with good dating and also some melatonin spray that made Dr Jo pleased. On Wednesday, I had a visit from my friend Nego Pierre Louis. He is a young youth minister in Haiti. He introduced me to Ellen, his Canadian bride to be. They were married on Friday so I could not attend the wedding. That would have been fun.

I did manage to drop my laptop on Thursday night as I was inputting the pharmacy inventory data and lost about 1 hour’s time. It is okay and I brought the hard copies home to key here at my desk.”

……………………………

Are you interested in Helping out with missions work?

If you live in the Charlotte, North Carolina area and also have a heart for the people and would like to get involved in missions to Haiti or in other South America countries you can contact the Providence Rd Church of Christ missions team at: http://prcoc-missions.com/contactus.aspx or at the PRCOC.org

Abortion Risks – Risks of Abortion Procedures

Considering Abortion? Call 800-395-HELP

Learn About Abortion Procedures and Abortion Risks

Abortion is not just a simple medical procedure. For many women, it is a life changing event with significant physical, emotional, and spiritual consequences. Most women who struggle with past abortions say that they wish they had been told all of the facts about abortion and its risks.

Our trained consultants are available 24/7 to answer your questions about abortion and to connect you to local help. Call 1-800-395-HELP or e-mail us as at all hours. You can also read the information below to learn more about abortion procedures and the risks associated with abortion.

Abortion Procedures

Manual Vacuum Aspiration: up to 7 weeks after last menstrual period (LMP)

This surgical abortion is done early in the pregnancy up until 7 weeks after the woman’s last menstrual period. A long, thin tube is inserted into the uterus. A large syringe is attached to the tube and the embryo is suctioned out.

Suction Curettage:  between 6 to 14 weeks after LMP

This is the most common surgical abortion procedure.  Because the baby is larger, the doctor must first stretch open the cervix using metal rods. Opening the cervix may be painful, so local or general anesthesia is typically needed. After the cervix is stretched open, the doctor inserts a hard plastic tube into the uterus, then connects this tube to a suction machine.  The suction pulls the fetus’ body apart and out of the uterus. The doctor may also use a loop-shaped knife called a curette to scrape the fetus and fetal parts out of the uterus.  (The doctor may refer to the fetus and fetal parts as the “products of conception.”).

Dilation and Evacuation (D&E): between 13 to 24 weeks after LMP

This surgical abortion is done during the second trimester of pregnancy. At this point in pregnancy, the fetus is too large to be broken up by suction alone and will not pass through the suction tubing. In this procedure, the cervix must be opened wider than in a first trimester abortion. This is done by inserting numerous thin rods made of seaweed a day or two before the abortion. Once the cervix is stretched open the doctor pulls out the fetal parts with forceps. The fetus’ skull is crushed to ease removal. A sharp tool (called a curette) is also used to scrape out the contents of the uterus, removing any remaining tissue.

Dilation and Extraction (D&X) (partial-birth abortion): from 20 weeks after LMP to full-term

This procedure takes three days. During the first two days, the cervix is stretched open using thin rods made of seaweed, and medication is given for pain. On the third day, the abortion doctor uses ultrasound to locate the legs of the fetus. Grasping a leg with forceps, the doctor delivers the fetus up to the head. Next, scissors are inserted into the base of the skull to create an opening. A suction catheter is placed into the opening to remove the brain. The skull collapses and the fetus is removed.

RU486, Mifepristone (Abortion Pill) Within 4 to 7 weeks after LMP

This drug is only approved for use in women up to the 49th day after their last menstrual period.  The procedure usually requires three office visits.  On the first visit, the woman is given pills to cause the death of the embryo. Two days later, if the abortion has not occurred, she is given a second drug which causes cramps to expel the embryo.  The last visit is to determine if the procedure has been completed.  RU486 will not work in the case of an ectopic pregnancy.  This is a potentially life-threatening condition in which the embryo lodges outside the uterus, usually in the fallopian tube.
If an ectopic pregnancy is not diagnosed early, the tube may burst, causing internal bleeding and in some cases, the death of the woman.

Consider the Risks of Abortion

Side effects may occur with induced abortion, whether surgical or by pill. These include abdominal pain and cramping, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea.  Abortion also carries the risk of significant complications such as bleeding, infection, and damage to organs.  Serious complications occur in less than 1 out of 100 early abortions and in about 1 out of every 50 later abortions. Complications may include:

  • Heavy Bleeding – Some bleeding after abortion is normal. However, if the cervix is torn  or the uterus is punctured, there is a risk of severe bleeding known as hemorrhaging. When this happens, a blood transfusion may be required.  Severe bleeding is also a risk with the use of RU486.  One in 100 women who use RU486 require surgery to stop the bleeding.
  • Infection – Infection can develop from the insertion of medical instruments into the uterus, or from fetal parts that are mistakenly left inside (known as an incomplete abortion).  A pelvic infection may lead to persistent fever over several days and extended hospitalization.  It can also cause scarring of the pelvic organs.
  • Incomplete Abortion – Some fetal parts may be mistakenly left inside after the abortion. Bleeding and infection may result.
  • Sepsis – A number of RU486 or mifepristone users have died as a result of sepsis (total body infection).
  • Anesthesia – Complications from general anesthesia used during abortion surgery may result in convulsions, heart attack, and in extreme cases, death.  It also increases the risk of other serious complications by two and a half times.
  • Damage to the Cervix – The cervix may be cut, torn, or damaged by abortion instruments.  This can cause excessive bleeding that requires surgical repair.
  • Scarring of the Uterine Lining – Suction tubing, curettes, and other abortion instruments may cause permanent scarring of the uterine lining.
  • Perforation of the Uterus – The uterus may be punctured or torn by abortion instruments. The risk of this complication increases with the length of the pregnancy. If this occurs, major surgery may be required, including removal of the uterus (known as a hysterectomy).
  • Damage to Internal Organs – When the uterus is punctured or torn, there is also a risk that damage will occur to nearby organs such as the bowel and bladder.
  • Death – In extreme cases, other physical complications from abortion including excessive bleeding, infection, organ damage from a perforated uterus, and adverse reactions to anesthesia may lead to death. This complication is rare, but is real.

Consider Other Risks of Abortion

Abortion and Preterm Birth:

Women who undergo one or more induced abortions carry a significantly increased risk of delivering prematurely in the future. Premature delivery is associated with higher rates of cerebral palsy, as well as other complications of prematurity (brain, respiratory, bowel, and eye problems).

Abortion and Breast Cancer:

Medical experts are still researching and debating the linkage between abortion and breast cancer. Here are some important facts:

  • Carrying your first pregnancy to full term gives protection against breast cancer.  Choosing abortion causes loss of that protection.
  • A number of reliable studies have concluded that there may be a link between abortion and the later development of breast cancer.

A 1994 study in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute found: “Among women who had been pregnant at least once, the risk of breast cancer in those who had experienced an induced abortion was 50% higher than among other women.”

Emotional and Psychological Impact:

There is evidence that abortion is associated with a decrease in both emotional and physical health.  For some women these negative emotions may be very strong, and can appear within days or after many years.  This psychological response is a form of post-traumatic stress disorder.  Some of the symptoms are:

  • Eating disorders
  • Relationship problems
  • Guilt
  • Depression
  • Flashbacks of abortion
  • Suicidal thoughts
  • Sexual dysfunction
  • Alcohol and drug abuse

Spiritual Consequences

People have different understandings of God. Whatever your present beliefs may be, there is a spiritual side to abortion that deserves to be considered. Having an abortion may affect more than just your body and your mind — it may have an impact on your relationship with God. What is God’s desire for you in this situation? How does God see your unborn child? These are important questions to consider.

Explore Your Options

You have the legal right to choose the outcome of your pregnancy. But real empowerment comes when you find the resources and inner strength necessary to make your best choice. Here are some other options.

Parenting

Choosing to continue your pregnancy and to parent is very challenging. But with the support of caring people, parenting classes, and other resources, many women find the help they need to make this choice.

Adoption

You may decide to place your child for adoption. Each year over 50,000 women in America make this choice. This loving decision is often made by women who first thought abortion was their only way out.

Help Is Available

Facing an unexpected pregnancy can seem overwhelming. That is why knowing where to go for help is important. Talk to someone you can trust – your partner, your parents, a pastor, a priest or perhaps a good friend. Also, the caring people at your pregnancy center are available to help you through this difficult time. To find a pregnancy center near you, call 1-800-395-HELP.

Note: Our network of participating pregnancy centers offers peer counseling and accurate information about all pregnancy options; however, these centers do not offer or directly refer for abortion services.

To access source documentation click here.